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'Easter' Categories

Power Connection

When Herbert Jackson was assigned to the mission field, he was given a car that wouldn't start without a push. So he would round up kids from the school to give his car a push when he needed to go somewhere; or if he was out making his rounds, he'd either park on a hill or just leave the car running. He went through this trouble for two years. 

When he was heading home, he was showing the new missionary what had to be done to get the car going. The new guy took a look under the hood, and said, "Uh, Dr. Jackson, I believe the only trouble is this loose cable." He gave the cable a twist, slid behind the wheel, and the engine roared to life.  

Dr Jackson later explained to a seminary class that for two years he'd pushed that car around, and all he needed to do was connect the cable. 

As Christians, we also often live in our own power, struggling and pushing to get by. But the resurrection power of Jesus is available to us all along the way—if we'll just "connect" to Him by prayer and faith!

Presumed Dead, but Alive

Darrell Johnson was presumed dead for more than 30 years. Since 1976 he had been listed among the 144 victims of the Big Thompson Canyon flood in Colorado. But on the morning of the flood Johnson and his family had ch... [Read More]

Reference: Fort Collins Coloradoan, "Man presumed dead in 1976 Colo. Flood found alive," Yahoo.com (8/3/08)

The Great Mystery

Death has always been the great mystery. There are as many theories as to what happens after death as there are cultures and religions.

For example, the Egyptians believed death was the beginning of a dangerous jo... [Read More]

Reference: “Afterlife,” wikipedia.org

Riddles

I have some riddles for you. They’re from the book Einstein’s Riddle: Riddles, Paradoxes, and Conundrums to Stretch Your Mind. Don’t worry, I’m not going to give you the riddle for which the book is named, whic... [Read More]

Reference: Jeremy Stangroom, Einstein’s Riddle: Riddles, Paradoxes, and Conundrums to Stretch Your Mind (Bloomsbury, 2009), pp. 33, 137, 13, 136, 81, 141